Housatonic III AO-35 - History

Housatonic III AO-35 - History


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Housatonic III

(AO-35: dp. 21,825 fl.; 1. 520'0"; b. 68'0"; dr. 30'10";
s. 17 k.; cpl. 239; a. 1 4", 4 3"; cl. Chicopee)

The Third Housatonic was a tanker completed in November 1941 by the Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pa., under the name Esso Albany. After two voyages for Standard Oil CompanY of New Jers-ey, she was acquired by the Navy 9 January 1942, converted to a fleet oiler, and renamed Housatonic.

Shakedown training in Chesapeake Bay ended 10 March, and Housatonic joined Service Force, Atlantic Fleet. During the remainder of 1942 Housatonic carried fuel oil and aviation gas from the Gulf of Mexico to ports on the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean. A shortage of escorts necessitated the oiler's proceeding alone through waters infested with German submarines which were making many kills at that time. In July, the fleet oiler performed her first fueling at sea, servicing carrier Ranger, cruiser Augusta, and six destroyers engaged in ferrying Army ~ 40 fighter plans aboard the carrier from Port of Spain to Akkra on the Gold Coast of Africa. Fuel from Housatonic enabled this group to return to Port of Spain without stopping or putting into any port during the entire voyage.

In November, during Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa, Housatonic fueled battleships, cruisers and destroyers while they were at sea supporting the assault and capture of Cassablanca, French Morocco.

During 1943, the fleet oiler made four voyages to the Mediterranean from New York and Norfolk fueling destroyers at sea as they escorted convoys which supported the victorious allied campaigns in North Africa, Sicily, and southern Italy. In between these voyages she made one run from Norfolk to Argentia, Newfoundland and five from Texas ports to Norfolk. The close of the year found her at Bermuda training new destroyer escorts in the techniques of fueling at sea.

In 1944 Housatonic made three voyages from Norfolk to the Mediterranean, the first to Casablanca, the next to Oran, and the last to Naples. Then came a round trip from New York to Seotland and back with fast convoys. The highlight of this voyage came in Clyde where she fueled Queen E1izabeth.

Housatonic departed Norfolk 20 November for the Caroline Islands via Aruba, the Panama Canal, and Pearl Harbor. She arrived Ulithi 31 December and joined the Serviee Force, Pacifle Fleet. From the first of the year until the surrender of Japan Housatonic was based at Ulithi whence she steamed to sea to fuel carriers, battleships, battle cruisers, cruisers, and destroyers of fast carrier groups which hammered Japanese installations as gigantic America sea power swept inexorably toward Japan. In this way she supported operations which took Luzon, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa and which bombarded the Japanese home islands.

After the surrender of Japan, Hougatonic operated in the Yellow Sea fueling carriers, cruisers, and destroyers of the 7th Fleet which were supporting the occupation of North China and Korea. Floating mines made this duty particularly dangerous.

Housatonic arrived Tokyo Bay 17 October, and remained there until departing for the United States 12 November. She arrived San Franeisco 26 November and decommissioned there 11 March 1946. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission 22 October and was sold to her former owner, The Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, 14 October 1947.


USS Housatonic (AO-35)

USS Housatonic (AO-35) was a acquired by the United States Navy for use during World War II. She was the third ship of the U.S. Navy named for the Housatonic River in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Housatonic was a tanker completed in November 1941 by Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pennsylvania, under the name SS Esso Albany. After two voyages for Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, she was acquired by the Navy 9 January 1942, converted to a fleet oiler, and renamed Housatonic.

Shakedown training in Chesapeake Bay ended 10 March, and Housatonic joined Service Force, Atlantic Fleet. During the remainder of 1942 Housatonic carried fuel oil and aviation gas from the Gulf of Mexico to ports on the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean. A shortage of escorts necessitated the oiler's proceeding alone through waters infested with German submarines which were making many kills at that time. In July, the fleet oiler performed her first fueling at sea, servicing carrier Ranger (CV-4), cruiser Augusta (CA-31), and six destroyers engaged in ferrying U.S. Army P-40 fighter planes aboard the carrier from Port of Spain to Akkra on the Gold Coast of Africa. Fuel from Housatonic enabled this group to return to Port of Spain without stopping or putting into any port during the entire voyage.

In November, during Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa, Housatonic fueled battleships, cruisers, and destroyers while they were at sea supporting the assault and capture of Casablanca, French Morocco .

During 1943, the fleet oiler made four voyages to the Mediterranean from New York and Norfolk fueling destroyers at sea as they escorted convoys which supported the victorious allied campaigns in North Africa, Sicily, and southern Italy. In between these voyages she made one run from Norfolk, Virginia, to Argentia, Newfoundland, and five from Texas ports to Norfolk. The close of the year found her at Bermuda training new destroyer escorts in the techniques of fueling at sea.

In 1944 Housatonic made three voyages from Norfolk to the Mediterranean, the first to Casablanca, the next to Oran, and the last to Naples, Italy. Then came a round trip from New York to Scotland and back with fast convoys. The highlight of this voyage came in Clyde, where she fueled RMS Queen Elizabeth.

Housatonic departed Norfolk 20 November for the Caroline Islands via Aruba, the Panama Canal, and Pearl Harbor. She arrived Ulithi 31 December and joined the Service Force, Pacific Fleet. From the first of the year until the Surrender of Japan Housatonic was based at Ulithi whence she steamed to sea to fuel carriers, battleships, battle cruisers, cruisers, and destroyers of fast carrier groups which hammered Japanese installations as gigantic America sea power swept inexorably toward Japan. In this way she supported operations which took Luzon, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa and which bombarded the Japanese home islands.

After the Surrender of Japan, Housatonic operated in the Yellow Sea fueling carriers, cruisers, and destroyers of the U.S. 7th Fleet which were supporting the occupation of North China and Korea. Floating mines made this duty particularly dangerous.

Housatonic arrived Tokyo Bay 17 October, and remained there until departing for the United States 12 November.

She arrived San Francisco, California, 26 November and decommissioned there 11 March 1946. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission 22 October and was sold to her former owner, The Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, 14 October 1947.

In 1963, she was converted into a container ship. The ship was scrapped some time after she last changed hands, 14 July 1989. [ 1 ]


Blood tests

How blood tests are performed:

  • Either in your doctor's office or in a lab, a sample of blood is drawn from your arm.
  • The sample is then analyzed for levels of important substances, such as sodium and potassium (sometimes called electrolytes), albumin (a type of protein), creatinine (which is connected with kidney function) and certain biomarkers, which can help diagnose heart failure and predict outcomes.

Abnormal results may indicate a strain on the heart or on other organs such as the kidneys and liver, which often results from heart failure.


USS Housatonic (AO-35)

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

  • 5,375 t (light)
  • 22,430 t (full) Ώ]
  • geared steam turbines
  • single shaft
  • 9,000 hp (6,700 kW)

USS Housatonic (AO-35) was a Chicopee-class oiler acquired by the United States Navy for use during World War II. She was the third ship of the U.S. Navy named for the Housatonic River in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Housatonic was a tanker completed in November 1941 by Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Chester, Pennsylvania, under the name SS Esso Albany. After two voyages for Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, she was acquired by the Navy 9 January 1942, converted to a fleet oiler, and renamed Housatonic.

Shakedown training in Chesapeake Bay ended 10 March, and Housatonic joined Service Force, Atlantic Fleet. During the remainder of 1942 Housatonic carried fuel oil and aviation gas from the Gulf of Mexico to ports on the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean. A shortage of escorts necessitated the oiler's proceeding alone through waters infested with German submarines which were making many kills at that time. In July, the fleet oiler performed her first fueling at sea, servicing carrier Ranger  (CV-4) , cruiser Augusta  (CA-31) , and six destroyers engaged in ferrying U.S. Army P-40 fighter planes aboard the carrier from Port of Spain to Akkra on the Gold Coast of Africa. Fuel from Housatonic enabled this group to return to Port of Spain without stopping or putting into any port during the entire voyage.

In November, during Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa, Housatonic fueled battleships, cruisers, and destroyers while they were at sea supporting the assault and capture of Casablanca, French Morocco.

During 1943, the fleet oiler made four voyages to the Mediterranean from New York and Norfolk fueling destroyers at sea as they escorted convoys which supported the victorious allied campaigns in North Africa, Sicily, and southern Italy. In between these voyages she made one run from Norfolk, Virginia, to Argentia, Newfoundland, and five from Texas ports to Norfolk. The close of the year found her at Bermuda training new destroyer escorts in the techniques of fueling at sea.

In 1944 Housatonic made three voyages from Norfolk to the Mediterranean, the first to Casablanca, the next to Oran, and the last to Naples, Italy. Then came a round trip from New York to Scotland and back with fast convoys. The highlight of this voyage came in Clyde, where she fueled RMS Queen Elizabeth.

Housatonic departed Norfolk 20 November for the Caroline Islands via Aruba, the Panama Canal, and Pearl Harbor. She arrived Ulithi 31 December and joined the Service Force, Pacific Fleet. From the first of the year until the Surrender of Japan Housatonic was based at Ulithi whence she steamed to sea to fuel carriers, battleships, battle cruisers, cruisers, and destroyers of fast carrier groups which hammered Japanese installations as gigantic America sea power swept inexorably toward Japan. In this way she supported operations which took Luzon, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa and which bombarded the Japanese home islands.

After the Surrender of Japan, Housatonic operated in the Yellow Sea fueling carriers, cruisers, and destroyers of the U.S. 7th Fleet which were supporting the occupation of North China and Korea. Floating mines made this duty particularly dangerous.

Housatonic arrived Tokyo Bay 17 October, and remained there until departing for the United States 12 November.

She arrived San Francisco, California, 26 November and decommissioned there 11 March 1946. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission 22 October and was sold to her former owner, The Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, 14 October 1947.

In 1963, she was converted into a container ship. The ship was scrapped some time after she last changed hands, 14 July 1989. Ώ]


Contents

Composition Edit

Three Places in New England was composed between 1903 and 1929. The set was completed in 1914 but was later revised for performance in 1929. The second piece, Putnam’s Camp, Redding, Connecticut was created from two short theater orchestra pieces composed by Ives in 1903. These pieces, "Country Band" March and Overture & March: "1776", were completed in 1904. Lyman Brewster, Ives's uncle, had asked him to compose the pieces for his play Major John Andre which was never performed due to Brewster's untimely death. In the early fall of 1912, Ives began tinkering with these compositions again. The satisfaction that Ives derived from working on the Fourth of July (the third movement of his Holiday Symphony), in which he used the trio (or middle) section of 1776, may have been the catalyst for inspiring him to reuse these lost songs and create a longer piece. By October, Ives had completed an ink score-sketch of Putnam's Camp. The final version of the piece clearly resembles its source materials, but many of the complex musical jokes that littered the originals had been replaced with simpler alternatives.

The Housatonic at Stockbridge, the third piece in the set, was composed in 1911 along with the opening movement. By 1912, after finishing Putnam's Camp, Ives had settled on the form of a three-movement orchestral set and had written the majority of it.

Premiere and publication Edit

In 1929, Nicolas Slonimsky, conductor of the Boston Chamber Orchestra at that time, contacted Ives about the possibility of performing Three Places. Slonimsky had been urged by American composer Henry Cowell, Ives's contemporary, to program an Ives piece for some time and Three Places caught his attention.

The thorough reworking required to transform Three Places from an orchestral score to one that could be performed by a much smaller chamber orchestra renewed Ives's interest in the work. Slonimsky required that the piece be rescored for 1 flute, 1 oboe, 1 English horn, 1 clarinet, 1 bassoon, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, 1 trombone, 1 percussionist, 1 piano, 7 violins, 2 violas, 2 cellos and 1 string bass, a much smaller orchestra than the original. Ives was glad to have his piece played, but his comments on the rescoring include, on the full score of The Housatonic at Stockbridge, "piano may be used for Bassoons throughout… a poor substitute…." [ This quote needs a citation ]

Three Places was first performed on February 16, 1930 under Slonimsky's direction before the American Committee of the International Society for Contemporary Music in New York City. Although it had been rehearsed only once, the Committee was sufficiently impressed to recommend the work to the International Society, which surprisingly turned it down for performance at its festival. The first public performance was scheduled for January 10, 1931. Ives himself attended – in fact, he was funding the concert himself. The performance received mild applause, and Ives congratulated the performers backstage – "Just like a town meeting – every man for himself. Wonderful how it came out!". [1]

After the mild success of the first performance, Slonimsky and Ives were inspired to take Three Places abroad. Slonimsky conducted the work in Paris on June 6 at a concert he described as "absolutely extraordinary" [ This quote needs a citation ] because so many important composers and critics of the time were in the audience. Their first experience of Ives left them impressed: Ives's music was not just interesting because it was composed by an American, it also fascinated them because the music really described America. Although the listeners didn't understand all the cultural references, Ives was calling attention to American ideals, issues, experiences and perspectives. For instance, in The "St. Gaudens", Ives paraphrases ragtime, slave plantation songs such as "Old Black Joe" and even patriotic American Civil War tunes such as "Marching through Georgia". The combination of such songs conjured up images of the fight for freedom in America. International recognition solidified the image of Ives as an American composer, especially strengthened by his use of borrowing from typically American-sounding pieces.

Three Places became the first of Ives's compositions to be commercially published. Slonimsky was in touch with the Boston publisher C.C. Birchard on Ives’ behalf, and by 1935 the two had negotiated a deal. Ives and Slonimsky both proofread the score note-by-note to make sure the engravings were correct. In 1935, Ives held a copy of his first work in his hands. He had requested that the binding bear his name in as small a font as possible, so as to not appear egotistical. [ citation needed ]

Later history Edit

For many years, very little interest in performance of Three Places was aroused by its publication. After Slonimsky's retirement from conducting, the piece lay dormant until 1948, when longtime BSO concertmaster Richard Burgin programmed it on a Boston Symphony Orchestra concert. The current practice of performing Ives's chamber scores rescored for full orchestra was thus established.

In the 1970s, interest in Three Places in New England was piqued once again, this time regarding the differences between the original 1914 scoring, much of which had been lost, and the 1929 chamber-orchestra rescoring for Slonimsky's chamber orchestra. James Sinclair of Yale University, after extensive research, concluded that the 1914 orchestration could not be recreated in its entirety since only 35% of the second movement had survived Ives's cutting for the 1929 version. Sinclair created what is currently believed to be the closest replication of the 1914 score for full orchestra by extrapolating Ives's scraps, sketches and notes. The world premiere of this version took place on February 9, 1974, at Yale University's Woolsey Hall, with the Yale Symphony Orchestra, conducted by John Mauceri, honoring the composer's 100th birthday. [2] [3]

I. The "St. Gaudens" in Boston Common (Col. Shaw and his Colored Regiment) Edit

The first movement of Three Places is a tribute to the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial near the corner of Beacon and Park Streets in Boston, Massachusetts. The monument was created over fourteen years by the world-renowned artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens in honor of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, the second all-Black regiment to serve in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Colonel Robert Shaw was the White Boston commander who led the Regiment in their assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina. Of the six hundred men who stormed the fort, 272, including Shaw, were killed, captured, or wounded. They were subsequently recognized for their courage and valor in battle.

Composed between c. 1913 and c.1923 and revised in 1929, it is possible that initial sketches of this piece were penned as far back as May 1911, at the time of Ives's move to Hartsdale, New York. A distinguishing characteristic of the movement is its sophisticated handling of harmonic progressions, technically atonal though supporting a diatonic melody dominated by the interval of a minor third.

Ives referred to the piece as a brooding "Black March", [ This quote needs a citation ] inspired by a reflective experience at the monument. The piece evokes images of a long, slow march South to battle by the 54th. It achieves this with the use of minor third ostinatos in the bass. Ives uses chromaticism, placed distantly below the main themes, to make it sound like a vague recollection of the events rather than a vivid depiction.

The piece builds to a dynamic high before rapidly receding, perhaps to signify the fate of the regiment at Fort Wagner. From a full, rich C-major chord at measure 63 (rehearsal letter H), the music falls into minor disarray and, for the last 2 + 1 ⁄ 2 minutes, it can be heard as a solemn memorial to those lost or the crushed hopes of hundreds of black soldiers who had come to fight for the freedom of other blacks.

Borrowing Edit

Of particular significance is the main melody, which is made up of a patchwork of motives from old plantation tunes or parlor songs such as "Massa's in the Cold Ground" and "Old Black Joe", and the patriotic Civil War songs "Marching Through Georgia" and "The Battle Cry of Freedom". The paraphrasing of these pieces is especially clear in the opening bars of the piece, where motives from the three main sources interweave to create an American-sounding pentatonic melody typical of many 19th-century American songs.

Throughout the opening of the piece, ostinatos based upon minor third intervals are heard in the bass instruments. These are intended to evoke images of a solemn trudge down to battle. They, too, are derived from the same four source materials as the main melody. Throughout "Marching Through Georgia", "Old Black Joe", "The Battle Cry of Freedom" and "Massa's in the Cold Ground", minor third intervals predominate.

Ives chose these sources because of their musical similarities and the possibility of creating fresh, seamless motives from them. Furthermore, the pieces have strong extra-musical associations Ives used to full advantage. Mixing patriotic Civil War songs with old slave plantation songs created a vivid image honoring those who fell fighting for the emancipation of blacks during the Civil War.

Other borrowings in this first movement include "Reveille" and "Deep River".

II. Putnam’s Camp, Redding, Connecticut Edit

Derived from two earlier pieces, "Country Band March" and Overture & March: "1776" (both 1904), Putnam's Camp was finished in 1912. It is thought that working on his Fourth of July was an impetus for Ives here since he had just recently used the trio (or middle) section of 1776 in that work. A distinguishing characteristic of this movement is the combination of multiple divisions of the orchestra playing against each other while occasionally throwing in asymmetrical phrases or wild dissonances.

Putnam's Camp, near Redding, Connecticut, was established as a historic landmark by the Connecticut legislature in 1887 and named in honor of the American Revolutionary War General Israel Putnam, who set up a camp in the area during the winter of 1778–79. The site has been preserved as a historic treasure because of Putnam's important role in the Revolutionary War, especially the Battle of Bunker Hill. Fourth of July celebrations are often held at the site due to its historic significance.

Ives wrote a program into the score, describing the story:

Once upon a '4 July,' some time ago, so the story goes, a child went here on a picnic, held under the auspices of the First Church and the village cornet band. Wandering away from the rest of the children past the camp ground into the woods, he hopes to catch a glimpse of some of the old soldiers. As he rests on the hillside of laurels and hickories the tunes of the band and the songs of the children grow fainter and fainter – when-"mirabile dictu"-- over the trees on the crest of the hill he sees a tall woman standing. She reminds him of a picture he has of the Goddess Liberty – but the face is sorrowful – she is pleading with the soldiers not to forget their "cause" and the great sacrifices they have made for it. But they march out of camp with fife and drum to a popular tune of the day. Suddenly, a new national note is heard. Putnam is coming over the hills from the center, – the soldiers turn back and cheer. – The little boy awakes, he hears the children's songs and runs down past the monument to "listen to the band" and join in the games and dances.

James Sinclair, who was responsible for the work done in the 1970s to recreate the original score of Three Places, correlated many of the measures in the score for Putnam's Camp with this program. A picture has since been worked out which shows the measures of the piece along with their programmatic significance.

Borrowing Edit

Ives borrowed extensively from American patriotic tunes to create the imagery of frantically patriotic Fourth of July celebrations. The opening measures are typical of Ives in their heavy chromaticism and varying time signatures ( 4
4 against 9
8 ) to create the sound of community marching bands. This touchingly realistic interpretation resolves shortly after the start of the piece into a B ♭ major march, but chromaticism and disarray are never far from breaking through, giving the impression that the musicians in this band are only amateurs.

Ives also experimented with quoting famous musical excerpts in different keys from the main theme. This idea stems from an incident when Ives was listening to two different marching bands and could still hear one band marching away while the other was marching towards him, thus sounding like two pieces simultaneously played in two different keys.

Many American patriotic tunes, such as "Yankee Doodle" are quoted during the piece. In the last two measures of the piece, the national anthem resolves to an unexpected, dissonant chord.

III. The Housatonic at Stockbridge Edit

First drafts were written primarily in the summer of 1908, reworked in 1911 and then again in 1913, extending the atmospheric depiction of mists and running water far longer than the original first two measures. The scoring was completed in 1914. It was arranged as a song in 1921 to lines excerpted from Robert Underwood Johnson's poem To the Housatonic at Stockbridge, but this final movement of Three Places in New England is purely orchestral. It features strident polyrhythmic activity in the strings, coupled with a hymn tunes Isaac B. Woodbury's hymn tune "Dorrance" and "Missionary Chant".

This piece was inspired by a walk Ives had taken with his new wife, Harmony, in June 1908 on a honeymoon hiking trip in western Massachusetts and Connecticut, a rural setting they enjoyed so much that they chose to go back to the Berkshires the very next weekend. While there, they took a walk by the Housatonic River near Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Ives recalled,

We walked in the meadows along the river, and heard the distant singing from the church across the river. The mist had not entirely left the river bed, and the colors, the running water, the banks and elm trees were something that one would always remember. [4]

Two days later, on 30 June 1908, Ives sketched some ideas to try to capture the atmosphere of this rustic scene. He used irregular, quasi-isorhythmic ostinatos in the violins to create the image of mist and fog rolling over swirling waters, and an English horn and violas to mimic the sound of singing from a church across the river.

Borrowing Edit

Unlike the other pieces in this set, no American folk tunes are quoted in it. Instead, this piece exemplifies Ives' use of paraphrase of "Dorrance", and can thus be classed as an extended paraphrased melody using the following devices:

  • Rhythmic alteration (mm. 7–9, 11–12).
  • Omission (mm. 9–10, 12–13)
  • Repetition (mm. 17–19) (third, fourth verses) (a single note in Ives's melody takes the place of two notes in the source)
  • Interpolation of new material
  • Variation of previously paraphrased materials (mm. 35–36, 37–38 vary material paraphrased for m. 23)

"Missionary Chant" begins in the same way as Dorrance except for an added note, which occasionally Ives adds to his paraphrased melody, suggesting that "Missionary Chant" may also be borrowed.

Ives recomposed this movement as an art song for a solo singer with piano accompaniment. The original symphonic version was purely instrumental, but conductor Michael Tilson Thomas took the liberty of adding a full choir to sing the "Dorrance"-based melody in place of the horns/woodwinds/lower strings when he rerecorded the work in 2002 with the San Francisco Symphony on the RCA label. This was likely inspired by performing Ives's Holiday Symphony, which originally did use a chorus at the end of the final movement.


USS Housatonic (AO-35)

ยูเอส Housatonic (AO-35) เป็น ชี -class oiler มาจาก กองทัพเรือสหรัฐฯ สำหรับการใช้งานในช่วง สงครามโลกครั้งที่สอง เธอเป็นเรือลำที่สามของกองทัพเรือสหรัฐฯตั้งชื่อตามชื่อ Housatonic แม่น้ำ ใน แมสซาชูเซต และ คอนเนตทิคั

  • 5,375 ตัน (เบา)
  • 22,430 ตัน (เต็ม) [1]
  • มุ่ง กังหันไอน้ำ
  • เพลาเดียว
  • 9,000 แรงม้า (6,700 กิโลวัตต์)

Housatonic เป็นเรือบรรทุกน้ำมันเสร็จสมบูรณ์ในพฤศจิกายน 1941 โดย ดวงอาทิตย์ต่อเรือและอู่ Co. , เชสเตอร์เพนซิล ภายใต้ชื่อเอสเอส เอสโซ่อัลบานี หลังจากที่ทั้งสองเดินทางสำหรับ มาตรฐาน บริษัท น้ำมันของรัฐนิวเจอร์ซีย์ เธอถูกซื้อโดยกองทัพเรือ 9 มกราคม 1942, แปลงเป็น oiler อย่างรวดเร็วและเปลี่ยนชื่อ Housatonic

ปอกลอก การฝึกอบรมใน Chesapeake Bay สิ้นสุดวันที่ 10 มีนาคมและ Housatonic เข้าร่วม บริการกองทัพเรือเดินสมุทรแอตแลนติก ในช่วงที่เหลือของปี 1942 Housatonic ดำเนิน น้ำมันเชื้อเพลิง และ การบินก๊าซ จาก อ่าวเม็กซิโก ไปยังท่าเรือบนชายฝั่งมหาสมุทรแอตแลนติกและใน ทะเลแคริบเบียน การขาดแคลนผู้คุ้มกันจำเป็นต้องดำเนินการตามลำพังของผู้ผลิตน้ำมันผ่านน่านน้ำที่เต็มไปด้วย เรือดำน้ำของ เยอรมัน ซึ่งทำให้มีผู้เสียชีวิตจำนวนมากในเวลานั้น ในเดือนกรกฎาคมเรือเดินสมุทรได้ทำการเติมน้ำมันในทะเลเป็นครั้งแรกโดยให้บริการเรือบรรทุก Ranger (CV-4) , เรือลาดตระเวน Augusta (CA-31) และ เรือพิฆาต 6 ลำที่ เข้าร่วมในการข้ามฟาก เครื่องบินรบ P-40 ของ กองทัพสหรัฐฯ บนเรือบรรทุกจาก ท่าเรือสเปน เพื่อ Akkra ใน โกลด์โคสต์ ของ แอฟริกา เชื้อเพลิงจาก Housatonic ทำให้กลุ่มนี้สามารถกลับไปที่ ท่าเรือสเปนได้ โดยไม่ต้องหยุดหรือเข้าท่าเรือใด ๆ ในระหว่างการเดินทางทั้งหมด

ในเดือนพฤศจิกายนในระหว่างการ ใช้ไฟฉาย , การบุกรุกของ แอฟริกาเหนือ , Housatonic เชื้อเพลิง เรือรบ , คัน และ ความมุ่งมั่น ในขณะที่พวกเขาอยู่ในทะเลที่สนับสนุนการโจมตีและการจับตัวของ คาซาบลังกา , ฝรั่งเศสโมร็อกโก

ในช่วงปี 1943 oiler เรือเดินสมุทรสี่เดินทางไปยัง ทะเลเมดิเตอร์เรเนียน จาก นิวยอร์ก และนอร์โฟล์คเติมน้ำมันหมื่นในทะเลขณะที่พวกเขาพา ขบวน ซึ่งได้รับการสนับสนุนแคมเปญพันธมิตรชัยชนะใน แอฟริกาเหนือ , ซิซิลี และทางตอนใต้ของ อิตาลี ในระหว่างการเดินทางเหล่านี้เธอออกเดินทางครั้งหนึ่งจาก นอร์ฟอล์กเวอร์จิเนีย ไป อาร์เจนเทียนิวฟาวด์แลนด์ และอีกห้าแห่งจาก ท่าเรือ เท็กซัส ไปยังนอร์ฟอล์ก ในช่วงใกล้ปีพบเธอที่ เบอร์มิวดา ฝึกเรือพิฆาตคุ้มกันใหม่ในเทคนิคการเติมน้ำมันในทะเล

ในปี 1944 Housatonic ทำสามเดินทางจาก Norfolk ไปยังทะเลเมดิเตอร์เรเนียนคนแรกที่ คาซาบลังกา , ที่อยู่ถัดจาก โอแรน และคนสุดท้ายที่ เนเปิลส์ประเทศอิตาลี จากนั้นเดินทางไปกลับจากนิวยอร์กไป สกอตแลนด์ และกลับด้วยขบวนรถเร็ว ไฮไลต์ของการเดินทางครั้งนี้มาใน ไคลด์ ที่เธอเชื้อเพลิง RMS Queen Elizabeth

Housatonic ออกนอร์โฟล์ค 20 พฤศจิกายนสำหรับ หมู่เกาะคาโรไลน์ ผ่าน อารูบา ที่ คลองปานามา และ เพิร์ลฮาร์เบอร์ เธอถึง Ulithi วันที่ 31 ธันวาคมและเข้าร่วมกับ กองทัพบริการเรือเดินสมุทรแปซิฟิก ตั้งแต่ช่วงแรกของปีจนถึง Surrender of Japan Housatonic ตั้งอยู่ที่ Ulithi จาก นั้นเธอได้นำเรือบรรทุกน้ำมันเรือประจัญบานเรือรบเรือลาดตระเวนเรือลาดตระเวนและเรือพิฆาตของกลุ่มผู้ให้บริการที่รวดเร็วซึ่งทำลายการติดตั้งของญี่ปุ่นเนื่องจากกำลังทางทะเลขนาดมหึมาของอเมริกากวาดเข้าหากัน ญี่ปุ่น. ด้วยวิธีนี้เธอได้รับการสนับสนุนการดำเนินงานที่เอา ลูซอน , อิโวจิมา และ โอกินาว่า และที่ถล่มเกาะญี่ปุ่น

หลังจากที่ ญี่ปุ่นยอมจำนน , Housatonic ดำเนินการใน ทะเลเหลือง เติมน้ำมันให้บริการตำรวจและความมุ่งมั่นของ สหรัฐ 7 รถโดยสาร ซึ่งได้รับการสนับสนุนการประกอบอาชีพของทิศตะวันตกเฉียงเหนือ ของประเทศจีน และ เกาหลี ทุ่นระเบิดทำให้หน้าที่นี้อันตรายอย่างยิ่ง

Housatonic มาถึง อ่าวโตเกียวใน วันที่ 17 ตุลาคมและอยู่ที่นั่นจนกระทั่งออกเดินทางไป สหรัฐอเมริกา 12 พฤศจิกายน

เธอมาถึง ซานฟรานซิสโกแคลิฟอร์เนีย 26 พฤศจิกายนและปลดประจำการที่นั่น 11 มีนาคม พ.ศ. 2489 เธอถูกย้ายไปอยู่ใน คณะกรรมาธิการการเดินเรือ 22 ตุลาคมและถูกขายให้กับเจ้าของเดิมของเธอ บริษัท น้ำมันสแตนดาร์ดแห่งนิวเจอร์ซีย์ 14 ตุลาคม พ.ศ. 2490

ในปี 1963 เธอได้รับการดัดแปลงเป็น เรือคอนเทนเนอร์ เรือถูกทิ้งในช่วงเวลาหนึ่งหลังจากที่เธอเปลี่ยนมือครั้งสุดท้าย 14 กรกฎาคม พ.ศ. 2532 [1]


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