USS Memphis CL-13 - History

USS Memphis CL-13 - History


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USS Memphis CL-13

Memphis IV
(CL-13: dp. 7,050; 1. 555'6"; b. 55'4"; dr. 20'; s. 35 k.;
colt 790; a. 12 6", 7 3", 6 21" tt.; cl. Omaha)

Memphis (CL-13) was laid down by William Cramp & Sona, Philadelphia, Pa., 14 October 1920; launched 17 April 1924; sponsored by Miss Elizabeth R. Paine, daughter of Mayor Rowlett Paine of Memphis; and commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard 4 February 1925, Capt. Henry E. Lackey in command.

Late in February Memphis got underway for a shakedown cruise in the Caribbean. On 13 April the cruiser participated in the dedication of an American memorial gateway to Commodore Oliver H. Perry at Port-of-Spain Trinidad. Six years after the indomitable Perry had defeated the British on Lake Erie 10 September 1813, he died on board frigate John Adams at Port-of-Spain and was interred there until his remains were removed to Newport, R.I., 7 years later. In June Memphis joined ships of a scouting fleet off Honolulu, Hawaii, for a cruise to the South Pacific through September, with visits to Australia and New Zealand. From October to April 1926 she again operated in the West Indies before returning to her home port, New York.

Memphis next sailed for Europe, arriving off St. Nazaire, France, 26 June. Relieving Pittsburgh (CA-4) as flagship of Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in Europe 4 July, she operated in European waters into 1927. During a stay at Santander, Spain, 31 July to 31 August 1926 the ship was visited by King Alfonso XIII.

On 3 June 1927 Memphis embarked Capt. Charles A Lindbergh and his plane at Southampton, England; following his nonstop flight from New York to Paris. The next day the cruiser departed Cherbourg, France, arriving Washington, D.C., 11 June to debark her famous passenger at the Washington Navy Yard. For the rest of the year she performed surveillance duty along the Atlantic coast.

During January 1928, Memphis acted as part of an escort group for President Calvin Coolidge on a cruise to the West Indies. After 4 months of Caribbean operations, she served in the eastern Pacific.

On 5 June the cruiser arrived at Balboa, Canal Zone for duty off Central America to May 1933. Memphis operated in a peacekeeping capacity at Corinto, Nicaragua, during the inauguration of President Juan B. Sacasa in 1932. In the next 5 years she alternated duty along the west coast with patrols to the troubled area of the West Indies.

After a good will cruise to Australia in January 1938, Memphis reached Honolulu 1 April to rejoin the fleet for operations until she participated in the presidential review off San Francisco 12 July 1939. In August she sailed to Alaska, operating there until early l941.

As the time of U.S. involvement in World War II approached Memphis sailed to the east coast. She departed Newport 24 April 1941 to take part in the neutrality patrol of the ocean triangle Trinidad-Cape San Roque-Cape Verde Islands, arriving Recife, Brazil, 10 May. She continued operations in the South Atlantic for most of World War II. In March 1942 the ship escorted two Army transports in convoy to Ascension Island, where the Army's 38th Engineer General Service Regiment debarked to construct an airport as staging point for planes flying from~ the United States to Africa. By May she was on patrol near the entrance to Fort de-France, Martinique.

In January 1943 the cruiser flew President Franklin Roosevelt's flag off Bathurst, Gambia, during the Casablanca Conference 14 to 24 January. The President and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill outlined plans at that time for the invasion of Sicily and Italy. From February to September, Memphis was once more on patrol duty against blockade runners, mostly off Bahin an
Recife, Brazil.

President Amenzoga of Uruguay and President Getulio Vargas of Brazil toured the ship in January 1944 while their countries continued to give valuable aid in blockading the "Atlantic Narrows." The following year Mem/phi. sailed for Europe, arriving Naples, Italy, 16 January 1944. On the 27th, as flagship for Adm. Harold R. Stark, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in Europe, she got underway for Valletta, Malta, scene of preliminary Allied conferences prior to the Yalta Conference in February. Before the end of January the cruiser had two important
visitors: Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King and General of the Army George C. Marshall.

The 18th of February found Memphis at Algiers for President Roosevelt's last Allied conference before his return to the United States. The next 8 months she continued to receive distinguished leaders. She participated in the first anniversary ceremonies of the Allied landings at St. Raphael and St. Tropez, southern France, on the 18th of August and the Navy day festivities at Naples, Italy, the 27th of October. Late in November Memphis departed Tangier for Philadelphia, PA., where she decommissioned 17 December 1945. She was struck from the Navy list 8 January 1946 and sold to Patapsco Serap Co., Bethlehem, Pa., 18 December for scrapping following delivery 10 January 1947.


Inter-war period

Late in February, Memphis got underway for a shakedown cruise in the Caribbean. On 13 April, the cruiser participated in the dedication of an American memorial gateway to Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry at Port of Spain, Trinidad. [8] [9] [10] Six years after the indomitable Perry had defeated the British on Lake Erie on 10 September 1813, he died on board frigate John Adams at Port–of–Spain and was interred there until his remains were removed to Newport, R.I. seven years later. In June, Memphis joined ships of a scouting fleet off Honolulu, Hawaii, for a cruise to theSouth Pacific through September, with visits to Australia and New Zealand. From October 1925 to April 1926, she again operated in the West Indies before returning to her home port, New York City. [3]

Memphis next sailed for Europe, arriving off St. Nazaire, France on 26 June 1926, and relieved Pittsburgh as the flagship of Commander, US Naval Forces in Europe on 4 July. The new Commander, US Naval Forces in Europe was Vice-Admiral Guy Burrage. [11] Vice-Admiral Burrage served as Commander, US Naval Forces in Europe from 1926 to 1928. Memphis operated in European waters into 1927. During a stay at Santander, Spain from 31 July to 31 August 1926, the ship was visited by King Alfonso XIII. [3]

On 3 June 1927, Memphis embarked Captain Charles A. Lindbergh and his aeroplane 'Spirit of St Louis' at Southampton, England, following his nonstop flight from New York to Paris. The next day the cruiser departed Cherbourg, France, arriving Washington, D.C., on 11 June, to debark her famous passenger at the Washington Navy Yard. For the rest of the year she performed surveillance duty along the Atlantic coast. [3]

In January 1928, Memphis acted as part of an escort group for President Calvin Coolidge on a cruise to the West Indies. After four months of Caribbean operations, [3] she served in the western Pacific as part of Light Cruiser Division TWO attached to the Asiatic Fleet along with Milwaukee and Trenton. [12]

On 5 June, the cruiser arrived at Balboa, Canal Zone for duty off Central America to May 1933. Memphis operated in a peacekeeping capacity at Corinto, Nicaragua, during the inauguration of President Juan Bautista Sacasa in 1932. In the next five years she alternated duty along the west coast with patrols to the troubled area of the West Indies. [3]

After a good will cruise to Australia in January 1938, Memphis reached Honolulu on 1 April, to rejoin the fleet for operations until she participated in the presidential review off San Francisco on 12 July 1939. In August, she sailed to Alaska, operating there until early 1941. [3]


USS Memphis (CL 13)

Decommissioned 17 December 1945.
Stricken 8 January 1946.
Sold 10 January 1947 to Patapsco Scrap Co. (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.) to be broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Memphis (CL 13)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Capt. Stewart Allan Manahan, USN10 Dec 1938Jun 1940 ( 1 )
2Charles Jefferson Parrish, USNJun 194015 Dec 1941 ( 1 )
3Capt. Clinton Elgin Braine, Jr., USN15 Dec 194121 Sep 1942 ( 1 )
4T/Capt. George Elmer Maynard, USN21 Sep 19421 Oct 1942
5Capt. Henry Young McCown, USN1 Oct 1942Aug 1943 ( 1 )
6T/Capt. Ralph Waldo Hungerford, USNAug 19435 Aug 1944
7T/Capt. Charles Frederick Grisham, USN5 Aug 194429 Aug 1945
8T/Capt. Omer Archibald Kneeland, USN29 Aug 194517 Dec 1945

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Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.


Laststandonzombieisland

Here at LSOZI, we take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1833-1954 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places.- Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday, March 3, 2021: Crossing the Delaware to See the World

Boston Public Library Leslie Jones Collection

Here we see the Old Glory flying from the stern of the four-piper Omaha-class light (scout) cruiser, USS Trenton (CL-11) as she sits in dry dock at South Boston’s Charleston Navy Yard, 6 December 1931. Note the narrow destroyer-like beam, her four screws, and the curious arrangement of stacked 6-inch guns over her stern. She would specialize in waving that flag around the globe

The Omaha class

With the country no doubt headed into the Great War at some point, Asst. Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt helped push a plan by the brass to add 10 fast “scout cruisers” to help screen the battle line from the enemy while acting as the over-the-horizon greyhound of the squadron, looking for said enemy to vector the fleet to destroy.

As such, speed was a premium for these dagger-like ships (they had a length-to-beam ratio of 10:1), and as such these cruisers were given a full dozen Yarrow boilers pushing geared turbines to 90,000 shp across four screws. Tipping the scales at 7,050 tons, they had more power on tap than an 8,000-ton 1970s Spruance-class destroyer (with four GE LM2500s giving 80,000 shp). This allowed the new cruiser class to jet about at 35 knots, which is fast today, and was on fire in 1915 when they were designed. As such, they were a full 11-knots faster than the smaller Chester-class scout cruisers they were to augment.

The Artist’s conception of the final class design, made circa the early 1920s by Frank Muller. Ships of this class were: OMAHA (CL-4), MILWAUKEE (CL-5), CINCINNATI (CL-6), RALEIGH (CL-7), DETROIT (CL-8), RICHMOND (CL-9), CONCORD (CL-10), TRENTON (CL-11), MARBLEHEAD (CL-12), and MEMPHIS (CL-13).Catalog #: NH 43051

For armament, they had a dozen 6″/53 Mk12 guns arranged in a twin turret forward, another twin turret aft, and eight guns in Great White Fleet throwback above-deck stacked twin casemates four forward/four aft. These guns were to equip the never-built South Dakota (BB-49) class battleships and Lexington (CC-1) class battlecruisers, but in the end were just used in the Omahas as well as the Navy’s two large submarine cruisers USS Argonaut (SS-166), Narwhal (SS-167), and Nautilus (SS-168).

Besides the curious 6-inchers, they also carried two 3″/50s DP guns in open mounts, six 21-inch torpedo tubes on deck, another four hull-mounted torpedo tubes near the waterline (though they proved very wet and were deleted before 1933), and the capability to carry several hundred sea mines.

Mines on an Omaha class (CL 4-13) light cruiser Description: Taken while the ship was underway at sea, looking aft, showing the very wet conditions that were typical on these cruisers’ after decks when they were operating in a seaway. Photographed circa 1923-1925, before the addition of a deckhouse just forward of the ships’ after twin six-inch gun mount. Donation of Ronald W. Compton, from the collection of his grandfather, Chief Machinist’s Mate William C. Carlson, USN. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 99637

Triple 21-inch torpedo tubes on the upper deck of an Omaha (CL 4-13) class light cruiser, circa the mid-1920s. The after end of the ship’s starboard catapult is visible at the left. Donation of Ronald W. Compton, from the collection of his grandfather, Chief Machinist’s Mate William C. Carlson, USN. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 99639

The subject of our tale was the second U.S. Navy warship named for the New Jersey city famous for the small but pivotal Christmas 1776 battle after Washington crossed the Delaware. The first to blaze that trail on the Naval List was a steam frigate commissioned in 1877 and wrecked by a hurricane in Samoa in 1889.

USS Trenton (1877-1889) Making Sail, probably while in New York Harbor in the mid-1880s. The original print is a letterpress reproduction of a photograph by E.H. Hart, 1162 Broadway, New York City, published circa the 1880s by the Photo-Gravure Company, New York. NH 2909

Authorized in 1916, the new USS Trenton wasn’t laid down at William Cramp & Sons in Philadelphia until August 1920, finally commissioned on 19 April 1924.

Her four-month shakedown cruise ran some 25,000 miles, taking the shiny new cruiser as far as Persia before popping in at the choicest ports in the Mediterranean, circumnavigating the continent of Africa in the process, and ending at the Washington Naval Yard.

USS Trenton (CL-11) photographed circa the mid-1920s. NH 43751

Before her freshman year was up, two of her plankowners would earn rare peacetime Medals of Honor– posthumously.

While Trenton carried out gunnery drills about 40 miles off the Virginia capes on 24 October 1924, powder bags in her forward turret exploded, killing or injuring every man of the gun crew. The explosion erupted with such force that it thrust open the rear steel door and blew five men overboard, one of whom, SN William A. Walker, drowned. During the ensuing fire, Ens. Henry C. Drexler and BM1c George R. Cholister attempted to dump powder charges into the immersion tank before they detonated but the charges burst, killing Drexler, and fire and fumes overcame Cholister before he could reach his objective, and he died the following day.

After repairs and mourning, Trenton spent the next 15 years enjoying much better luck, busy sailing around the globe, participating in the standard peacetime work of Fleet Problems, exercises, foreign port calls, and the like. During much of this period, she served as a cruiser division flagship. About as hairy as it got during these happy days was putting a landing force ashore in China during unrest, a trip to take Marines from Charleston to Nicaragua in 1928, and responding to a 1930 revolt in Honduras during the Banana Wars.

USS TRENTON (CL-11) Carrying the U.S. secretary of the navy and the president of Haiti pass in review of the U.S. fleet, off Gonaives, Haiti, about 1925. USS ARIZONA (BB-39) is the nearest battleship. NH 73962

USS Trenton (CL-11) Flagship of Commander Light Cruiser Divisions, Scouting Fleet, underway at sea in April 1927. She has the Assistant Secretary of the Navy on board. NH 94168

USS Trenton in dry dock, South Boston, Dec 6, 1931, Boston Public Library Leslie Jones Collection.

Another of Leslie Jones’ superb shots, note her weapon layout.

A great view of her rudder and screws from the same collection.

And a bow-on shot, sure to be a hit with fans of dry docks. The slim profile of the Omahas is in good display here.

USS TRENTON (CL-11) In Pearl Harbor during the later 1930s. Color tinted photo, reproduced by the ship’s service store, Submarine Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, circa 1938. Collection of Rear Admiral Frank A. Braisted, USN ret., who was TRENTON’s commanding officer in 1937-38 NH 91636-KN

USS TRENTON (CL-11) in San Diego Harbor on 17 March 1934. NH 64630

USS TRENTON (CL-11) view taken at Sydney, N. S. W., in February 1938, during her visit to that port. Note that the ship is “dressed overall” with the Australian flag at the main. Also note French BOUGAINVILLE-class sloop astern. Courtesy of the Oregon Army National Guard, Oregon Military Academy, 1975. NH 82486

View of the commemorative map of the nearly 20,000-mile cruise made from San Diego, U. S. A., to Australia, and back to San Diego, from late 1937 to early 1938. Cruise made by sisterships USS TRENTON (CL-11), USS MILWAUKEE (CL-5), and USS MEMPHIS (CL-13). Courtesy of the Oregon Army National Guard, Oregon Military Academy, 1975. Catalog #: NH 82488

USS TRENTON (CL-11) Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, served in her as ComCruDiv Two from 9 July to 17 September 1938. He has signed this photo. NH 58114

Fita-Fita Guards handling USS Trenton’s lines at Naval Station, Tutuila, Samoa, March 31, 1938. Ironically, a warship of the same name was destroyed in Samoa in 1889 by Neptune. NARA # 80-CF-7991-2

USS Trenton (CL-11) in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, circa early 1939. Photographed by Tai Sing Loo. Trenton is carrying SOC floatplanes on her catapults. Donation of the Oregon Military Academy, Oregon National Guard, 1975. NH 82489

By June 1939, with the drums of war beating in Europe, our cruiser joined Squadron 40-T, the dedicated task force organized to protect American interests during the Spanish Civil War.

USS TRENTON (CL-11) View taken at Madeira, in the Azores, circa 1939. Note motor launch in the foreground. Courtesy of the Oregon Army National Guard, Oregon Military Academy, 1975. NH 82487

She was swinging at anchor in the idyllic French Riviera port of Villefranche-sur-Mer when Hitler marched into Poland in September.

Squadron 40-T, view taken at Villefranche-Sur-Mer, France, circa 1939, showing USS TRENTON (CL-11) and an unidentified U.S. “Four-pipe” destroyer in Harbor. NH 82493

Over the next 10 months, she would spend much of her time in neutral Portuguese waters awaiting orders, typically as squadron flagship with an admiral aboard. When finally recalled home in July 1940, following the collapse of the Low Countries to the German Blitzkrieg, Trenton carried exiled Luxembourger royals to America at the behest of the State Department.

Switching Europe for Asia, Trenton was ordered to the Pacific in November, and she was soon busy escorting transports carrying men and equipment to the Philippines with stops at scattered outposts such as Midway, Wake Island, and Guam, all of which would soon become battlegrounds.

By the time the balloon went up on 7 December 1941, our cruiser was moored at Balboa in the Panama Canal Zone, where she had been assigned on orders of ADM Stark to be ready to prowl the Eastern Pacific for enemy shipping and commerce raiders in the event of a real-live war.

Her first mission of WWII was to escort the joint Army-Navy Bobcat Force (Task Force 5614) to the French colony of Bora Bora in late January 1942, an operation that saw the first use of the Navy’s new Seabee units.

U.S. Navy ships in Teavanui Harbor in February 1942. The town of Vaitape is in the left-center. The cruiser and destroyer on the right are USS Trenton (CL-11) with four smokestacks, and USS Sampson (DD-394). An oiler is in the center distance. #: 80-G-K-1117.

While fast and with long legs, the Omaha class cruisers were under-armed and under-armored for 1940s fleet actions, a role that relegated them to the periphery of the conflict. As noted by Richard Worth in his Fleets of World War II:

The fleet sought a way to turn the Omahas into something valuable. Proposals included a conversion to carrier-cruiser hybrids or a complete reconstruction into aircraft carriers. A more realistic plan would have specialized the ships as AA escorts, retaining their twin mounts with a new DP battery of seven 5-inch guns, but the navy didn’t bother.

With that, Trenton kicked her heels for most of the war ranging from the Canal Zone to the Straits of Magellan, visiting the west coast ports of South America, the Juan Fernandez Islands, the San Felice chain, the Cocos, and the Galapagos, keeping an eye peeled for Axis vessels which never materialized.

USS TRENTON (CL-11) Underway off Bona Island in the Gulf of Panama, 11 May 1943. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Bow view. #: 19-N-44442

Same series, # 19-N-44440. Note, her seaplanes appear to be Kingfishers

In the same series, note the depth charge racks on her stern, something you don’t see a lot of on a cruiser. #: 19-N-44438

Following a two-month refit at Balboa, she shipped North for San Francisco in July 1944, cleared to finally get into the action.

When she left Panama, she had her war paint on.

USS Trenton (CL-11) underway in the Gulf of Panama, 14 July 1944. She is wearing camouflage Measure 33, Design 2f. #: 19-N-68655

USS Trenton (CL-11) in San Francisco Bay, California, 11 August 1944. Note her large SK annetnna atop the mast. The SK was a surface search radar capable of picking up a large airborne target, such as a bomber, at 100nm and a smallish surface contact, for example, a destroyer, at 13nm. She is wearing camouflage Measure 33, Design 2f. # 19-N-91697

Arriving at Adak in the Aleutian Islands on 2 September 1944, she joined the North Pacific Force as a unit of Cruiser Division One. She would soon be running amok in the Japanese Kuriles chain, alongside other members of her class such as sisterships USS Richmond and USS Concord (CL-10), who had, like Trenton, up to that time had spent most of the war in the Southeastern Pacific.

From her Trenton’s official War History, which is online at the National Archives:

Trenton fired her first shots against the enemy on 5 January 1945 in a bombardment of shore installation at Surubachi Wan, Paramushiru. There followed more shore bombardments against Kurabu Zaki, Paramushiru, on 18 February Matsuwa on 15 March and 10 and 11 June. On this last raid, Trenton, along with other units of Task Force 92, made an anti-shipping sweep inside the Kurile chain during daylight hours of 11 June before firing the second night’s bombardment. Targets on these islands included fish canneries, air strips, and hangars, radar and gun installations, and bivouac areas. Aerial reconnaissance showed substantial damage inflicted in these shellings by Task Force 92.

Trenton’s guns got a heck of a workout during this period. For instance, in the 15 March raid on Matsuwa alone, they fired 457 Mk. 34 high capacity, 18 Mk. 27 common, and 14 Mk. 22 illum shells in a single night. This was accomplished in 99 salvos fired at an average rate of 4.95 salvos per minute, or 22.45 shells per minute. A star shell was set to burst every sixth salvo, providing “excellent illumination,” while the ship used her SG radar to furnish ranges and bearings and Mk 3 radar to check range to the land from fire bearings with correction adjusted accordingly. The firing was done from 13,000 yards and ran for just 21 minutes. Not bad shooting!

The cruiser also helped put some licks in on Japanese surface contacts.

Trenton’s last war-time action occurred 23 to 25 June, when the task force again made an anti-shipping sweep along the central Kuriles. With the force split over a wider area, the other unit made contact with the enemy inside the chain. By sinking five ships out of a small convoy [the auxiliary submarine chasers Cha 73, Cha 206, and Cha 209, and guard boat No. 2 Kusunoki Maru, sunk and the Cha 198 damaged], Task Force 92 disclosed the presence of U.S. Naval Forces in the Sea of Okhotsk and set off a wave of alarm in the Japanese press and radio. Fear of this “formidable task force prowling the northern home waters of Japan,” coupled with the increased attacks by Task Forces 38 and 58 to the south, convinced the Japanese that they were at last surrounded and added to their discouragement which led to the surrender in August.

Steaming for San Francisco to get an overhaul in for the final push on the Home Islands, Trenton was there when the war ended. Ordered to proceed to Philadelphia via the Canal that she spent most of the war protecting, she arrived there just before Christmas 1945 and was decommissioned. Like the rest of her class, there was little use for her in a post-war Navy filled with shiny new and much more capable cruisers, so they were liquidated entirely and without ceremony.

Of her sisters, they proved remarkably lucky, and, though all nine saw combat during the war– including Detroit and Raleigh who were at Pearl Harbor– none were sunk. The last of the class afloat, USS Milwaukee (CL-5) was sold for scrap at the end of 1949, mainly because after 1944 she had been loaned to the Soviets as the Murmansk.

As for Trenton, she was stricken from the Navy List on 21 January 1946 and later sold for $67,228 to the Patapsco Scrap Co. along with sistership Concord, who reportedly fired the last naval bombardment of the war.

Trenton had a string of 15 skippers in her short 21-year career, four of whom would go on to put on admiral’s stars including ADM “Old Dutch” Kalbfus who commanded the battlefleet on the eve of WWII, the long campaigning VADM Joseph Taussig, and ADM Arthur Dewey Struble who led the 7th Fleet during the miracle landings at Inchon.

One of the most tangible remnants of the vessel is the State silver service that she carried for most of her career. Originally made for the first battleship USS New Jersey (BB-16) in 1905 by Tiffany & Co., Trenton became caretaker of the 105-piece set when she was commissioned as the obsolete Virginia class of pre-dreadnought was disposed of as part of the Washington Naval Treaty in 1920. Trenton turned the set back over to the Navy during WWII for safekeeping and it was eventually presented to the Iowa-class battlewagon (BB-62) post-war. Today half the set, which is still owned by the Navy, is at the New Jersey Governor’s Mansion while the other half is on display in a secure case in the captain’s quarters of the Battleship New Jersey museum.

Silver service of USS NEW JERSEY then on USS TRENTON, 1933. NH 740

The Navy has recycled the name “Trenton” twice since 1946. The first for an Austin-class amphibious dock (LPD-14) which served from 1971 through 2007 and is still in service with the Indian Navy as INS Jalashwa (L41), a name which translates roughly into “seahorse.”

An undated file photo of a starboard bow view of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Trenton (LPD 14) underway. Trenton was one of several ships that participated in Operation Praying Mantis, which was launched after the guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine on April 14, 1988. (U.S. Navy photo 30416-N-ZZ999-202 by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Bates/Released)

The fourth and current Trenton is an MSC-operated Spearhead-class expeditionary fast transport (T-EPF-5), in-service since 2015.

1946 Jane’s plan, by which time only Milwaukee was still in service– with the Soviets!

Displacement: 7,050 long tons (7,163 t) (standard) 9,508 full load
Length: 555 ft. 6 in oa, 550 ft. pp
Beam: 55 ft.
Draft: 14 ft. 3 in (mean), 20 feet max
Machinery: 12 × Yarrow boilers, 4 × Westinghouse reduction geared steam turbines, 90,000 ihp
Range: 8460 nm at 10 knots on 2,000 tons fuel oil
Speed: 35 knots estimated design, 33.7 knots on trials
Sensors: SK, 2 x SG, 2 x Mk 3 radars fitted after 1942
Crew: 29 officers 429 enlisted (peacetime)
Armor:
Belt: 3 in
Deck: 1 1⁄2 in
Conning Tower: 1 1⁄2 in
Bulkheads: 1 1⁄2–3 in
Aircraft carried: 2 × floatplanes (typically Vought O2U-1 then Curtiss SOC Seagulls), 2 amidships catapults
Armament:
(1924)
2 × twin 6 in /53 caliber
8 × single 6 in /53 caliber
2 × 3 in /50 caliber guns anti-aircraft
6 × triple 21 in torpedo tubes
4 × twin 21 in torpedo tubes
224 × mines (capability removed soon after completion)
(1945)
2 × twin 6 in/53 caliber
6 × single 6 in/53 caliber
8 × 3 in/50 caliber anti-aircraft guns
6 × triple 21 in torpedo tubes
3 × twin 40 mm Bofors guns
14 × single 20 mm Oerlikon cannons

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3 Answers 3

There some additional photos of this round hole at this page (in russian):

Good quality shoot from unknown source. Text in russian is: "А что значит это отверстие в правом боку подводной лодки" - "And what is meaning of this hole in right side of the submarine". It is clearly seen that hole has very sharp edges on its top and left sides. Also we can see that hole is not round in its low-right side (as it was required in comments, taken from other angle):

This is a copy from the TV-film discussed ("Kursk: a Submarine in Troubled Waters"):

This photo is labelled: "пресс-центр ГП РФ" "ГП РФ" is abbreviation for "Генеральная Прокуратура Российской Федерации", so "Press-center of Prosecutor General’s Office of the Russian Federation" (press center of Federal Attorney of Russia):

This photo has date mark on it "24' 4'02" = 24.04.2002 and text "район прочного корпуса напротив которого отверстие в легком корпусе. никаких пробоин нет" = "region of strong hull (=inner hull=pressure hull) opposite of which hole in light hull (=external hull) /is located/. There are no any breaches":

And finally is frame with labels "росляково. мурманская область. РТР". It has label of Russian federal channel RTR. According to the page, Carre says that this hole was not shown on TV, but it was:

There is interesting phrase on military history forum "vif2ne":

From: tevolga To: All Date: 31.10.2001 11:06:44 Rubrics: Modernity, Fleet

Subject: Round hole on Kursk

Commander-in-chief /of the Navy/ clarified that hole was cut by divers early as in previous year /2000/, no any relation is possible to hypothetical collision or to torpedo attack. The hole will be welded now to limit more of myths :-)))

With respect to the community.

Other phrase is on federal newspaper forum

Alexander Pokrovsky, 11 August, 2012 at 09:24

In "Rubin" (=Rubin Design Bureau, operator of the Raising operation of Kursk) I was told about this hole: was technological incision

The newspaper "Независимая Газета" directly says in 2001-11-01:

Round hole between first and second compartments, which was seen by millions of TV viewers at the time of airing of film by Chief Military Prosecutor Office, turns out to have artificial origin: part of hull was cut in previous year (=2000) at the request of the Commander-in-chief /of the Navy/ (=Vladimir Kuroedov). When it will be returned in place for investigative purposes, much may become clearer, Kuroedov hinted.

A torpedo does NOT penetrate the hull of a target vessel, it will have a proximity fuse with possible backup contact fuse and probably a timer fuse as well. So that's one claim already debunked.

Can't find independent verification of this (it's most likely classified what exact fuzing modes exist), but it is consistent with knowledge I have accumulated over the years about torpedoes from several post-WW2 designs (WW2 and earlier designs typically used contact fuses).

This DOT&E report mentions "influence fuzing", meaning magnetic, acoustic, etc. rather than impact or time delay.

The MK 48 ADCAP torpedo is a submarine launched, heavyweight acoustic homing torpedo with sophisticated sonar and an influence-fuzed warhead. The improved ADCAP torpedo includes all digital guidance and control systems, digital fusing systems, and propulsion improvements, which add speed, depth, and range capability. The Mk 48 class torpedoes are the Navy's only submarine launched torpedoes used for engagement of submarine and surface targets, contributing significantly to the submarines' precision engagement. They are also essential to the force protection role of submarines. There are a number of upgrades to the ADCAP torpedo discussed in the following paragraphs.
Every seemingly interesting bit of detail ends after a few words with: More details are provided in the classified version of this report.

This Powerpoint presentation (unreferenced, but with photographs) shows the effect of a Mk.48 torpedo detonating to sink an old frigate. Compare the damage done by the warhead exploding under the ship to the supposed "entry hole" :)

As to the collision claim, collisions between submarines have happened in the past so might have happened here, but are highly unlikely to lead to the ships sinking. And if one were to sink, I'd expect the smaller, lighter built one to sink which would be the US submarine. (The Kursk is a lot larger than a US (or Soviet/Russian) fast attack sub.)

While there are many mysteries surrounding the sinking of the K141, like why the explosion wasnt investigated when it was first detected by the Peter the great, why the underwater rescue vessel had not been tested on the hull of the Kursk (which was fitted with 8 inches of acoustic rubber) and why the Russian officials lied and said first off that it was only a malfunction and that they had established communications etc. which understandably makes anything released by them in future questionable, the acoustic data recorded by several stations across alaska and europe all tally with the actual damage found on the K141.

The collision theory is rubbish, the size of the K141 in relation to a Los Angeles class or a Swiftsure class submarine, would mean the Los Angeles of Swiftsure would have been completely destroyed by the collision, if not, so damaged it would have had to surface. The reports of the Memphis being damaged are also clearly rubbish. It docked in Norway several days later, right opposite a big housing estate in Bergan, clearly visible to all and sundry. If it was damaged in an incident of this nature, i would have been hidden away in the dry dock cut into the mountain, which was only a mere hundred or so yards away in the same port, and hidden well away from prying eyes.

The torpedoing theory is also rubbish. the American MK48 torpedo, when tested by the Australian navy on a decommissioned destroyer, thats right, a destroyer, tore the ship in half, right down the middle. there was no little hole entry followed by the devastation zone, just a big explosion impact zone followed by a big crack the width of the destroyer (google it, you'll see what i mean) any MK48 torpedo that would have hit Kursk would have totally obliterated it, not just caused damage to the forward 5 sections.

The tests on the type of torpedo that were carried out in the wake of the K141's recovery, were consistant with the initial theory of the torpedo exploding in the tube. Multiple tests were carried out by using explosives under the torpedo, dropping the torpedo, lighting fires under the torpedo etc, and could not replicate the explosion in any way externally. This means the initial explosion could have only come from inside the torpedo tube, and the only source of this explosion logically, is a leak in the HTP (High Test Peroxide) reservoir which mixed with a substance that caused the rapid expansion of pressure and heat within the torpedo tube.

This in turn caused a fire that super heated the forward cabin to a temp of between 2000 and 5000 degrees, which in turn caused the fatal explosion of the other 4-8 torpedoes.

Either that, or it was due to a 'Shkval' torpedo misfiring. a 'Shkval' is a supercavitating torpedo that reduces water resistance by producing a gas bubble around the torpedo, which minimises water resistance. The Shkval is rocket powered and can likely achieve speeds in excess of 370 MPH, making it almost impossible to defend against.

It is theorised that the rocket motor fired whilst still in the tube and before the tube had been flooded, causing the first explosion picked up by the acoustic data when the hatch door was blown off (the hatch door was found embedded into the rear bulkhead of the torpedo room confirming the was some sort of explosion in the tube) this then superheated the chamber and caused a number of the remaining conventional torpedoes to 'cook off' and explode

This was the event that registered 3.5 on the richter scale and was picked up over several thousand miles.

Of course, the Russian government has never actually announced that they were testing a new type of shkval that day, but then, if they were, they would hardly announce it, even after the accident.

Occum's razor suggests that the simplest answer is most often the correct one. And i'm afraid, that in the case of the K141, this actually is the case. Somewhere between the official HTP explosion explaination and the unofficial Shkval explosion theory, is likely the truth. But either way, have no doubt that it WAS a torpedo explosion in the tube that caused the Kursk's sinking, both the acoustic and the physical evidence prove that beyond doubt.

Although given the Russian governments attempt at covering things up and lying at the beginning of the whole saga, i can totally understand why people think there is more to it that.


USS Memphis - FDR Presidential Flagship - 1943. .

USS Memphis - FDR Presidential Flagship - 1943. USS Memphis (CL-13) was an Omaha-class light cruiser commissioned in 1925. She was the fourth ship named for the city of Memphis, Tennessee. The city was named for its location on the Mississippi River, similar to the Memphis located on the Nile, principal city of the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt.

The ensign of the USS Memphis is a 72" X 120" (approximate) wool, 48-star, with double applique stars and sewn stripes, Sterling brand flag made by Annin & Company, America's largest WWII flag maker. The flag is finished with heading and grommets. There is a maker's mark on the upper obverse hoist, and the upper reverse hoist is marked, "USS MEMPHIS CL13."

At the start of WWII, the Memphis was on patrol and escort duty as the flagship of the U.S. Navy's South Atlantic Force, operating out of Natal, Brazil, where she would spend most of her wartime service. In January she was diverted to the British crown colony of Gambia on the west coast of Africa to provide accommodations for President Roosevelt who was in route to the Casablanca conference for military planning with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and a meeting with Free French Generals Charles de Gaulle and Henri Giraud.

The Memphis was tasked with hosting the president after Michael Reilly, FDR's personal bodyguard who also served as head of the White House Secret Service detail, determined that Gambia's capital, Bathurst (now Banjul) was, "a disease-infected post with no suitable living accommodations." FDR's Presidential Flag, which had been made shipboard by the Memphis' crew, flew above the Memphis on the 13th and 14th of January 1943, until he departed Memphis for Yundum Field the RAF station in Gambia, for his flight to Casablanca.

After FDR's departure the Memphis returned to her duties patrolling the coats of Brazil, and Uruguay. In 1945, Memphis sailed for service in the Mediterranean where she served as flagship for Admiral Stark, Commander, US Naval Forces in Europe. She was on hand at the Yalta Conference and was at Algiers for President Roosevelt's last Allied conference. She continued to receive distinguished leaders as she
participated in the first anniversary ceremonies of the Allied landings in southern France on August 15th and the Navy Day festivities at Naples, Italy on October 27th. Late in November, she returned to the U.S. for decommissioning.

This flag represents an opportunity to acquire an ensign from a US Presidential Flagship. It is a great piece for collectors of presidential and naval WWII artifacts.

During her service the USS Memphis (CL-13) earned the Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medal, American Defense Service Medal with the Fleet Clasp, American Campaign Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal.

Condition: The flag is used, worn and torn, with wear in the fly corners. The bottom white stripe is torn, but the flag is otherwise intact.

This flag was formerly in the collection of Dr. Clarence Rungee, and is accompanied by his original museum inventory sheet with identifying information.


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Product Description

USS Memphis CL 13

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Memphis cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • USS Memphis Highlights 1925 - 1945
  • Officer Group Photos with Names
  • Crew Group Photos
  • Many Crew Activity Photos

Over 85 Photos on 19 Pages 3 of Detailed Descriptions.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Cruiser during World War II.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Memphis during the World War II era (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    USS Memphis (CL-13) 13-Star Ship's Boat Flag.. .

    USS Memphis (CL-13) 13-Star Ship's Boat Flag.
    Approximately 16 x 26-inches. Marked "USS MEMPHIS BOAT #1" on the obverse hoist. The Memphis was an Omaha-class light cruiser commissioned in February, 1925. The cruiser flew President Roosevelt's flag during the Casablanca and Yalta conferences. Dr. Rungee's notes indicate that this flag was flown by the ship's boat as it transferred the President from the boat to the shore for the conference.

    Condition: Machine-sewn stars, anchor and stripes. Metal grommets. Mounted to a small length of wooden pole. Scattered small to moderate holes with tears and small sections missing. Fair condition.

    This flag was formerly in the collection of Dr. Clarence Rungee, and is accompanied by his original museum inventory sheet with identifying information.


    USS Memphis CL-13 - History

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of naval history.

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Memphis CL 13 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • USS Memphis Highlights 1925 - 1945
    • Officer Group Photos with Names
    • Crew Group Photos
    • Many Crew Activity Photos

    Over 85 Photos on 19 Pages 3 of Detailed Descriptions.

    Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Cruiser during World War II.


    Watch the video: Kid Rock - American Badass DIRTY HQ