Summit AMC-106 - History

Summit AMC-106 - History


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Summit

(AMC-106: dp. 195; 1. 98'5; b. 23'6; dr. 10'8; B.
10 k.; cpl. 17; a. 2 .50 cal. mg., 2 .30 cal. mg.; cl.
Acme)

Summit (AMC-106) was laid down on 24 March 1941 by the Snow Shipyards Co., Rockland, Maine; launched on 20 September 1941, sponsored by Miss Louise Dey; and commissioned on 29 January 1942.

Summit proceeded to Yorktown, Va., with Stalwart (AMC-105) for a 10-day training period with the Mine Warfare School. They arrived on 25 February and, upon completion of training, were routed onward to Key West, Fla., for duty in the 7th Naval District. Summit arrived there on 16 March 1942 and served that district until June 1945.

Summit was reassigned to the Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Mayport, Fla., on 30 June. Her minesweeping equipment was removed, and she was detailed to duty in connection with aviation duty as a target towing ship. Her designation was changed from AMC-106 to IX-232 on 10 August. In November, she was ordered to the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, and reported there, on 13 December 1945, for duty with the Naval Air Training Command.

Summit was found to be in excess of Naval requirements in May 1946 and was decommissioned on 28 May. She was struck from the Navy list on 29 October 1946.


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Education Edit

Salzer was born in New York City, New York. He attended Phillips Exeter Academy and Yale University, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics in 1940. While at Yale, he was a member of the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps, and was commissioned an ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve on 23 December 1940. [1]

World War II, 1941-1945 Edit

After receiving his commission, Salzer was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations until 1942, when he joined the Accentor-class minesweeper Fulmar (AMc-46) . In March 1943 he assumed command of the coastal minesweeper Summit (AMc-106) , and in July 1943 that of the auxiliary motor minesweeper YMS-347. He then commanded the tank landing ship LST-624 from June 1944 to December 1945, [1] participating in the Lingayen Gulf landings, the Manila Bay-Bicol operations and the occupation of Okinawa. [2]

1946-1964 Edit

Salzer returned to the United States and was on inactive status from April to September 1946, before returning to active duty as the executive officer of the replenishment oiler Guadalupe (AO-32) . In February 1948 he joined the staff of the Commander of the Fleet Training Group, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, as Navigation Officer. After instruction at the Naval Intelligence School from July 1948 until December 1949, he served on the staff of that school. He returned to sea in March 1951 as executive officer of the destroyer Charles H. Roan (DD-853) , and in March 1952 became Assistant Intelligence Officer on the staff of Commander Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. In August 1952 he was assigned as an Intelligence Staff Officer on the staff of the Commander in Chief, U.S. European Command, and in April 1954 assumed command of the destroyer Abbot (DD-629) . [1]

He was a J-2 Staff Officer on the Joint Staff, Joint Chiefs of Staff, from April 1956 to July 1959, after which he attended the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. In June 1960 Salzer was Assistant for Joint Chiefs of Staff Matters in the Logistics Plans Division, in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He remained there until August 1961, then commanded the destroyer tender Bryce Canyon (AD-36) until January 1963, when he was detached to command Destroyer Division 132. In March 1963 he transferred to command of Destroyer Division 192. [1]

He returned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations in May 1964, where he served as Head of the Analytical Support Group until October 1965. He then served as Deputy Program Director for the Fast Deployment Logistic Ship Project. [1]

Vietnam War, 1966-1975 Edit

Salzer assumed command of Amphibious Squadron 4 in February 1966, serving from 1 April until 25 August 1967, when he became the Commander of River Assault Flotilla 1/River Support Squadron 7/Riverine Assault Force (Task Force 117) on 2 December 1967. [3] He was assigned duty as the Commander of "Operation Sealords" in October 1968. [1]

Salzer returned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations as Project Officer of the Future Professional Manpower Requirements Study from November 1968 to December 1969, when he assumed command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 3. He assumed command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 7 in September 1970, and after the disestablishment of that formation on 16 March 1971 returned to command of Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla 3. In April 1971 he was appointed Commander of United States Naval Forces Vietnam and Chief of the Naval Advisory Group, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. [1]

In September 1972 he became Commander of the Amphibious Force, Pacific Fleet. [1] On the creation of Commander, Naval Surface Forces Pacific in March 1975, he was the first incumbent.

Retirement, 1975-1988 Edit

Salzer retired in 1975 [4] to McLean, Virginia. [5] He then served as president of the Navy Relief Society, a not for profit organization, that provides relief to members of the Navy and Marine Corps.

He died of heart failure at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, on January 30, 1988. [5]


F-106A Delta Dart

The Delta Dart already had some visibility in the museum through the exhibition of the F-106 flight simulator that was assigned here in the 1970’s. The museum now has an actual plane from the 95th Fighter Interceptor Squadron that was stationed here in 1972. The Dart first flew in 1956 and a squadron of the delta wing interceptors was stationed at Dover AFB with the 95th from 1963 to 1973. An all weather interceptor known for its efficiency and ability to counter bomber aircraft up to 70,000 feet, the F-106A had a maximum speed of 1,525 mph (Mach 2.3) and a range of 1,500 miles. It carried four Falcon missiles and one Genie nuclear rocket. Starting in 1972, the 106’s were transferred to the 177th Fighter Interceptor Group at Atlantic City, NJ, making the Delta Dart the last type of fighter assigned to the Dover AFB. Put out to pasture as a fighter plane in the mid-1980s, the F-106 was put to work as a Target Drone for fighter pilot training. After many were expended in that program most of the remaining handful were sunk in the Florida Gulf to form an artificial reef for fish.


یواس‌اس سامیت (ای‌ام‌سی-۱۰۶)

یواس‌اس سامیت (ای‌ام‌سی-۱۰۶) (به انگلیسی: USS Summit (AMc-106) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۹۸ فوت ۵ اینچ (۳۰٫۰۰ متر) بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۴۱ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس سامیت (ای‌ام‌سی-۱۰۶)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۲۴ مارس ۱۹۴۱
آغاز کار: ۲۰ سپتامبر ۱۹۴۱
اعزام: ۲۹ ژانویه ۱۹۴۲
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: 195 tons
درازا: ۹۸ فوت ۵ اینچ (۳۰٫۰۰ متر)
پهنا: ۲۳ فوت ۶ اینچ (۷٫۱۶ متر)
آبخور: ۱۰ فوت ۸ اینچ (۳٫۲۵ متر)
سرعت: 10 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


A brief history of climate change

1712 - British ironmonger Thomas Newcomen invents the first widely used steam engine, paving the way for the Industrial Revolution and industrial scale use of coal.

1800 - world population reaches one billion.

1824 - French physicist Joseph Fourier describes the Earth's natural "greenhouse effect". He writes: "The temperature [of the Earth] can be augmented by the interposition of the atmosphere, because heat in the state of light finds less resistance in penetrating the air, than in re-passing into the air when converted into non-luminous heat."

1861 - Irish physicist John Tyndall shows that water vapour and certain other gases create the greenhouse effect. "This aqueous vapour is a blanket more necessary to the vegetable life of England than clothing is to man," he concludes. More than a century later, he is honoured by having a prominent UK climate research organisation - the Tyndall Centre - named after him.

1886 - Karl Benz unveils the Motorwagen, often regarded as the first true automobile.

1896 - Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius concludes that industrial-age coal burning will enhance the natural greenhouse effect. He suggests this might be beneficial for future generations. His conclusions on the likely size of the "man-made greenhouse" are in the same ballpark - a few degrees Celsius for a doubling of CO2 - as modern-day climate models.

1900 - another Swede, Knut Angstrom, discovers that even at the tiny concentrations found in the atmosphere, CO2 strongly absorbs parts of the infrared spectrum. Although he does not realise the significance, Angstrom has shown that a trace gas can produce greenhouse warming.

1927 - carbon emissions from fossil fuel burning and industry reach one billion tonnes per year.

1930 - human population reaches two billion.

1938 - using records from 147 weather stations around the world, British engineer Guy Callendar shows that temperatures had risen over the previous century. He also shows that CO2 concentrations had increased over the same period, and suggests this caused the warming. The "Callendar effect" is widely dismissed by meteorologists.

1955 - using a new generation of equipment including early computers, US researcher Gilbert Plass analyses in detail the infrared absorption of various gases. He concludes that doubling CO2 concentrations would increase temperatures by 3-4C.

1957 - US oceanographer Roger Revelle and chemist Hans Suess show that seawater will not absorb all the additional CO2 entering the atmosphere, as many had assumed. Revelle writes: "Human beings are now carrying out a large scale geophysical experiment. "

1958 - using equipment he had developed himself, Charles David (Dave) Keeling begins systematic measurements of atmospheric CO2 at Mauna Loa in Hawaii and in Antarctica. Within four years, the project - which continues today - provides the first unequivocal proof that CO2 concentrations are rising.

1960 - human population reaches three billion.

1965 - a US President's Advisory Committee panel warns that the greenhouse effect is a matter of "real concern".

1972 - first UN environment conference, in Stockholm. Climate change hardly registers on the agenda, which centres on issues such as chemical pollution, atomic bomb testing and whaling. The United Nations Environment Programme (Unep) is formed as a result.

1975 - human population reaches four billion.

1975 - US scientist Wallace Broecker puts the term "global warming" into the public domain in the title of a scientific paper.

1987 - human population reaches five billion

1987 - Montreal Protocol agreed, restricting chemicals that damage the ozone layer. Although not established with climate change in mind, it has had a greater impact on greenhouse gas emissions than the Kyoto Protocol.

1988 - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) formed to collate and assess evidence on climate change.

1989 - UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher - possessor of a chemistry degree - warns in a speech to the UN that "We are seeing a vast increase in the amount of carbon dioxide reaching the atmosphere. The result is that change in future is likely to be more fundamental and more widespread than anything we have known hitherto." She calls for a global treaty on climate change.

1989 - carbon emissions from fossil fuel burning and industry reach six billion tonnes per year.

1990 - IPCC produces First Assessment Report. It concludes that temperatures have risen by 0.3-0.6C over the last century, that humanity's emissions are adding to the atmosphere's natural complement of greenhouse gases, and that the addition would be expected to result in warming.

1992 - at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, governments agree the United Framework Convention on Climate Change. Its key objective is "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system". Developed countries agree to return their emissions to 1990 levels.

1995 - IPCC Second Assessment Report concludes that the balance of evidence suggests "a discernible human influence" on the Earth's climate. This has been called the first definitive statement that humans are responsible for climate change.

1997 - Kyoto Protocol agreed. Developed nations pledge to reduce emissions by an average of 5% by the period 2008-2012, with wide variations on targets for individual countries. US Senate immediately declares it will not ratify the treaty.

1998 - strong El Nino conditions combine with global warming to produce the warmest year on record. The average global temperature reached 0.52C above the mean for the period 1961-1990 (a commonly-used baseline).

1998 - publication of the controversial "hockey stick" graph indicating that modern-day temperature rise in the northern hemisphere is unusual compared with the last 1,000 years. The work would later be the subject of two enquiries instigated by the US Congress.

1999 - human population reaches six billion.

2001 - President George W Bush removes the US from the Kyoto process.

2001 - IPCC Third Assessment Report finds "new and stronger evidence" that humanity's emissions of greenhouse gases are the main cause of the warming seen in the second half of the 20th Century.

2005 - the Kyoto Protocol becomes international law for those countries still inside it.

2005 - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair selects climate change as a priority for his terms as chair of the G8 and president of the EU.

2006 - the Stern Review concludes that climate change could damage global GDP by up to 20% if left unchecked - but curbing it would cost about 1% of global GDP.

2006 - carbon emissions from fossil fuel burning and industry reach eight billion tonnes per year.

2007 - the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report concludes it is more than 90% likely that humanity's emissions of greenhouse gases are responsible for modern-day climate change.

2007 - the IPCC and former US vice-president Al Gore receive the Nobel Peace Prize "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change".

2007 - at UN negotiations in Bali, governments agree the two-year "Bali roadmap" aimed at hammering out a new global treaty by the end of 2009.

2008 - half a century after beginning observations at Mauna Loa, the Keeling project shows that CO2 concentrations have risen from 315 parts per million (ppm) in 1958 to 380ppm in 2008.

2008 - two months before taking office, incoming US president Barack Obama pledges to "engage vigorously" with the rest of the world on climate change.

2009 - China overtakes the US as the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter - although the US remains well ahead on a per-capita basis.

2009 - 192 governments convene for the UN climate summit in Copenhagen.


History of the EAC

In the past, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda have enjoyed a long history of co-operation under successive regional integration arrangements.

These arrangements have included:

  • the Customs Union between Kenya and Uganda in 1917, which the then Tanganyika later joined in 1927
  • the East African High Commission (1948-1961)
  • the East African Common Services Organisation (1961-1967)
  • the East African Community (1967-1977) and
  • the East African Co-operation (1993-2000).

Following the dissolution of the former East African Community in 1977, the Member States negotiated a Mediation Agreement for the pision of Assets and Liabilities, which they signed in 1984.

However, as one of the provisions of the Mediation Agreement, the three Member States (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda) agreed to explore areas of future co-operation and to make concrete arrangements for such co-operation.

Subsequent meetings of the three Heads of State led to the signing of the Agreement for the Establishment of the Permanent Tripartite Commission for East African Co-operation on 30 November 1993.

Full East African Co-operation operations started on 14 March 1996 when the Secretariat of the Permanent Tripartite Commission was launched at the Headquarters of the EAC in Arusha, Tanzania.

Considering the need to consolidate regional co-operation, the East African Heads of State, at their 2nd Summit in Arusha on 29 April 1997, directed the Permanent Tripartite Commission to start the process of upgrading the Agreement establishing the Permanent Tripartite Commission for East African Co-operation into a Treaty.

The Treaty-making process, which involved negotiations among the Member States as well as wide participation of the public, was successfully concluded within 3 years.

The Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community was signed in Arusha on 30 November 1999.

The Treaty entered into force on 7 July 2000 following the conclusion of the process of its ratification and deposit of the Instruments of Ratification with the Secretary-General by all the three Partner States.

Upon the entry into force of the Treaty, the East African Community came into being.

Milestones of EAC Integration

30 November 1993: 1st Summit of East African Heads of State sign Agreement establishing the Permanent Tripartite Commission for East African Co-operation in Kampala, Uganda.

14 March 1996: Secretariat of the Commission for East African Co-operation launched in Arusha, Tanzania.

28 April 1997: EAC Member States sign Tripartite Agreement on Avoidance of Double Taxation.

29 April 1997: 2nd Summit of the East African Co-operation Heads of State is held in Arusha, Tanzania 1st East African Co-operation Development Strategy (1997-2000), East African Flag and East African Passport launched and Permanent Tripartite Commission mandated to embark on process of upgrading EAC Agreement into Treaty.

30 April 1998: 9th Meeting of the Permanent Tripartite Commission in Arusha launches a draft Treaty for Establishment of the East African Community approves programme for its wide publicity EAC Memorandum of Understanding on Co-operation in Defence signed in Arusha Tripartite Agreement on Road Transport signed in Arusha and Inland Waterway Transport Agreement signed in Arusha.

30 November 1999: 4th Summit held in Arusha at which Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community is signed.

7 July 2000: Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community enters into force new regional organisation, the East African Community, comes into being.

15 January 2001: 1st Summit of the East African Community is held in Arusha signs Protocols on: Rules of Procedure for the Summit of Heads of State Rules of Procedure for the Admission of other countries to the East African Community and formally launches the East African Community at the Sheikh Amri Abeid Stadium in Arusha.

30 November 2001: 3rd Summit of EAC held in Arusha EAC Heads of State inaugurate East African Legislative Assembly and East African Court of Justice.

2 March 2004: EAC Summit signs Protocol for Establishment of the EAC Customs Union.

1 January 2005: EAC Customs Union becomes operational.

18 June 2007: The Republic of Rwanda and the Republic of Burundi accede to EAC Treaty.

1 July 2007: Rwanda and Burundi become full members of the EAC.

5 June 2007: Second Assembly (EALA) sworn in.

22 October 2008: First EAC-COMESA-SADC Tripartite Summit held in Kampala, Uganda. Discusses single Free Trade Area and merger of the three regional blocs.

1 July 2009: Rwanda and Burundi join the EAC Customs Union. Official launch ceremonies held simultaneously in the two countries&rsquo capitals on 6 July 2009.

20 November 2009: Protocol for the Establishment of the EAC Common Market signed climax of observance of EAC 10th Anniversary celebrations laying of foundation stone for EAC Headquarters in Arusha.

1 January 2010: EAC&rsquos fully-fledged Customs Union takes effect following the end of a five-year transitional period.

1 July 2010: EAC Common Market Protocol enters into force, following ratification by all the five EAC Partner States.

3 December 2010: EAC Summit of Heads of State adopts the EAC Anthem.

12 June 2011: Second COMESA-EAC-SADC Tripartite Summit held in Johannesburg, South Africa agrees to start negotiations for a Grand Free Trade Area among the three blocs.

5 June 2012: Third Assembly (EALA) sworn in.

28 November 2012: Presidents of the EAC Partner States officially inaugurate the new EAC Headquarters in Arusha.

30 November 2013: Protocol for the Establishment of the EAC Monetary Union signed.

16 Apil 2016: The Republic of South Sudan joins the EAC.

5 September 2016: The Republic of South Sudan becomes a full member of the EAC


Meet two of the most powerful supercomputers on the planet

Summit and Sierra are supercomputers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. They're helping us model supernovas, pioneer new materials and explore cancer, genetics and the environment — using technologies available to all businesses.

Summit has joined the fight against COVID-19. See what else IBM is doing.

What are Summit and Sierra?

A new kind of supercomputer, designed for data and AI

Learn about the architecture

Built to tackle the world’s biggest challenges

Discover real-world applications

Supercomputing at IBM: A brief history

See landmarks on the path to Summit and Sierra

Summit by the numbers

Quadrillion calculations per second

Petabytes storage capacity

IBM POWER9 CPUs

Gigabytes per second between nodes

27,648

NVIDIA Tesla GPUs

High-performancecomputing

HPC provides the computing power to advance AI and to solve big challenges in business, medicine, science and engineering

HPC provides the computing power to advance AI and to solve big challenges in business, medicine, science and engineering

A new kind of supercomputer, designed for data and AI

In March 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy awarded IBM the commission to build two supercomputers.

The mission was to develop a machine 5 to 10 times faster than its predecessor, Titan. Over four years, the DOE worked with a team of IBMers to break through countless technology barriers to build Summit and Sierra &mdash systems with the brains of AI and deep learning, and the brawn of 200 petaflops and 125 petaflops, respectively. One million times more powerful than the fastest laptop, these supercomputers can sift through thousands and thousands of variables and create models and simulations that can help researchers find answers to the world’s most complex problems.

Summit and Sierra represent a major shift from how IBM structured previous systems. IBM developed a new computing architecture that combines high-performance POWER9 CPUs with AI-optimized GPUs from our partner NVIDIA &mdash all linked at extremely high speeds and bandwidth.

In the supercomputers’ new architecture, compute is embedded everywhere data resides, producing incredible speed and creating a system purpose-built for AI. “By building these supercomputers, we are building the world’s leading AI machines,” says Hillery Hunter, IBM Fellow Director, Accelerated Cognitive Infrastructure.

Another radical shift is that the two machines are built with components available to any enterprise &mdash this technology is part of IBM’s product line, available to accelerate every business.

Built to tackle the world’s biggest challenges

“ Summit and Sierra will push the boundaries of computing and human understanding. ”

— Ginni Rometty, Former Chairman, President, and CEO, IBM

What will we do with 200 petaflops? Here are three sample applications:

Combat cancer

The arrival of these new supercomputers gives researchers a powerful boost in the fight against cancer. For example, machine learning algorithms scaled on Summit will help supply medical researchers with a comprehensive view of the U.S. cancer population at a level of detail typically obtained only for clinical trial patients.

Identify next-generation materials

Deep learning could help scientists identify materials for better batteries, more resilient building materials and more efficient semiconductors. By training algorithms to predict materials’ properties, researchers may answer longstanding questions about materials’ behaviors at atomic scales.

Accelerate understanding of disease

Using a mix of AI techniques, researchers will be able to identify patterns in the function, cooperation, and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems. Greater understanding of how these patterns give rise to clinical phenotypes — observable traits of diseases such as Alzheimer’s, heart disease and addiction — will inform the drug discovery process.


Special Collections

The Special Collections Division houses the Library's genealogy and local history materials. Our goal is to collect, preserve, and provide access to the history of Summit County and to continue to maintain one of the area's most extensive genealogy collections.

Our genealogy collection includes books, microfilm, periodicals, databases and more. While our collections are focused primarily on Ohio and surrounding states, we also actively collect materials for the states of the Eastern Seaboard, New England and the South.

Our local history collection includes a variety of materials pertaining to all aspects of Akron and Summit County history including the archival and photograph collections of the Summit County Historical Society. Sharing and providing access to these materials is our goal.

Summit Memory

The Summit Memory project is a countywide, collaborative effort to make available some of the remarkable local history collections maintained by our partner institutions. If your organization is located in Summit County and would like to participate in Summit Memory, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at 330.643.9030.



Main Library

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Monday: 10 am - 8 pm
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Sunday: CLOSED (Closed every Sunday from Memorial Day through Labor Day) -->

Drive-Up Window closes ten minutes before the building closes for the day


Ellet Library Branch

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Akron, Ohio 44312
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Watch the video: Summit